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The Great Beauty

The Great Beauty

The Great Beauty (2014) Starring: Toni Servillo, Carlo Verdone, Sabrina Ferilli, Carlo Buccirosso

play online casino games no deposit Director: Paolo Sorrentino

Enjoy hard rock online casino nj The Great Beauty for its rich cinematography. From interior lighting and camera angles to scenic outdoor panoramas, the filming and direction are superb. This is a reflective study that is best appreciated by a more mature, seasoned audience. Many of the characters are well beyond age 50.

A celebrated writer, aging Jep Gambardella ( online live casino usa Toni Servillo), having written just one outstanding novel, drifts among his also aging society cronies in the monied enclaves of central Rome. We observe how they roll during a crossroads in many of their lives. The writing and dialogue are sophisticated, laced with pathos, and balanced with forgiving irony. A fascinating range of characters come to life through a solid cast of pros, drawing us straight into their world effortlessly. Slow, steady, rambling, and quite thought provoking. Visual gourmet.

Italian with English subtitles, heavy on dialogue.

online casino dealer part time My grade: A

Robert Reoch

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Robert Reoch

Robert Reoch Rolling Thoughts

viva slots vegas casino games Robert Reoch holland casino online gambling Rolling Thoughts is just slots plus online casino me babbling when expressing myself won’t fit on playmgm online casino Twitter. I’ll be adding to this same post over time.

video slots online casino October 22, 2014

Dear indian casino bingo slots American Youth: Please read a self-help book on any topic. It will, at the very least teach you how to use your brain to accomplish something useful. Perhaps you might even avoid behaving badly like those fools that rioted in casino slot machine drop Keene, NH, during the annual online casino no deposit bonus usa Pumpkin Festival. What a bunch of douche bags. People with half a brain don’t pull this kind of shit—even if they get drunk. Only idiots riot out of boredom. Sad, stupid, no-common-sense morons. Like I said, please just read one self-help book on any topic. Try reading resorts casino online casino The Power of Positive Thinking, or online casino games ontario Think and Grow Rich, or online casino ohne einzahlung echtgeld I’m Okay-You’re Okay.

Good luck. I hope you make it another year without injuring yourself, or someone else.

P.S. This is funny. I sound like a really old person. I’m getting there though. I’ve earned this. pht-t-t!

best way to win casino slot machines Robert Reoch

Robert Reoch Goes to P-Town

Robert Reoch Visits Provincetown Massachusetts

blacklist online casino malaysia Robert Reoch (that’s me) and long time partner (he’s Joon) recently spent a few days and nights enjoying the sunshine and warmth of juegos de casino online chile Provincetown, Massachusetts, on are casino slots really random Cape Cod. We stayed at the comfortable and stylish Provincetown Hotel at Gabriel’s. We enjoyed our stay there so much that we’re planning to return again—much sooner than we had imagined before this memorable visit.

Traveling to Provincetown, we used all means of transportation to reach our destination. We began by taking the bus (which stops very close to our door) to the subway station, then after taking the subway from Harvard Station, we took the Gray Line bus to World Trade Center downtown Boston. It was then a brief walk to the pier where we boarded a fast ferry to Provincetown. Now that’s the way to go (instead of driving)!

Here are just a few photos from our trip:

At the Provincetown pier

At the Provincetown pier

Pilgrims Monument, Provincetown Massachusetts

Pilgrims Monument, Provincetown Massachusetts

At the Pilgrims Monument and Cape Cod Museum

At the Pilgrims Monument and Cape Cod Museum

At the top of Pilgrims Monument

At the top of Pilgrims Monument

At Herring Cove, northwest tip of the Cape

At Herring Cove, northwest tip of the Cape

Herring Cove

Herring Cove

"Tourists" statue on Commercial Street in Provincetown

“Tourists” statue on Commercial Street in Provincetown

Oh my gawd, the food here is so good!

Oh my gawd, the food here is so good!

Happy Travels!

Robert Reoch

Copyright Robert George Reoch Publishing

 

Cookies for Summer

Summer Cookies with Flair and Flavor

Cookies Ease the Mind and Satisfy

Cookies are my weakness. What better way to feed a sweet tooth than by baking them yourself. I’ve been collecting some great cookie cutters for months and finally found time to put them to use. You can use your favorite sugar cookie recipe to bake these. This summer, I came up with an idea to give my cookies a fruity summer twist. Yum!

The secret ingredients for my Summer Cookies are cardamom and ground coriander seed. Also, for a refreshing fruity twist, I’ve added orange, lemon, and lime oils to the mix—just a 1/4 teaspoon of each will do. Always use fresh ingredients (butter, eggs, and flour). Remember, when you bake cookies at home from scratch, it’s real food with actual food value—even if they are a little high in calories and fat. Moderation is the key. It’s fun to decorate them too!

Robert Reoch Summer Cookies

These won’t last long. . . nom-nom-nom….

Happy baking!

Robert Reoch

Copyright Robert George Reoch Publishing

The Avengers

The Avengers

The Avengers (2012) Starring: Robert Downey Jr., Chris Evans, Mark Ruffalo, Chris Hemsworth, Scarlett Johansson, Jeremy Renner, Tom Hiddleston, Clark Gregg, Stellan Skarsgard, Samuel L. Jackson, Gwyneth Paltrow

Director: Joss Whedon

Multiple Marvel Comics superheroes can work together well, even if they don’t always get along. They may even have a few spats, but they get their work done. 3-D effects keep getting better, and this film is the best example I’ve seen yet.

In this story, Thor’s half-brother, Loki, is back on the scene and bent on dominating stuff (in this case, the Earth) as usual. He manages a feasible plan, but is forced to contend with the agency known as S.H.I.E.L.D.—Strategic Hazard Intervention Espionage Logistics Directorate—including a potent assortment of superheroes hired as temps for the police.

This film moves quickly. The dialogue is smart and often funny. The outcome is predictable. Seen in an IMAX theater, children screamed and laughed in some parts, while the adults laughed in others. The movie was engaging enough that I could ignore the girl behind me kicking my seat and forgive the little boy beside me elbowing me and kicking me as he sucked on his gigantic soda loudly during the quiet parts. It’s a superhero movie. It’s noisy. I’ll never go to a matinée again.

My grade: A-

Robert George Reoch

Copyright Robert George Reoch Publishing

Rango

Rango

Rango (2011) Starring: Johnny Depp, Isla Fisher, Abigail Breslin, Ned Beatty, Alfred Molina

Director: Gore Verbinski

Is there anything Johnny Depp can’t do well? How about portraying an animated banged up chameleon prone to bad luck that is recruited as the sheriff in a town called Dirt? With this dried up desert town as the backdrop, sheriff Rango has his hands full. Ned Beatty voices the irresistible corrupt mayor of Dirt, who lords over the oppressed thirsty citizenry with his monopoly on the water supply.

Hilarious, colorful characters abound. Although the story slows in the middle, humor and distinctive voices keep things interesting. Johnny Depp continues his reign as king of inflection and nuance. The actor must have watched a ton of old movies to have picked up so many echoes from classics of the past. He brings a richer level of entertainment, rare in the industry today. This crazy role as an animated lizard is another example of his extraordinary talent. It makes this movie special.

My grade: B

Robert Reoch

Copyright Robert George Reoch Publishing

Hugo

Hugo

Hugo (2011)Starring: Asa Butterfield, BenKingsley, Chloë Grace Moretz, Sacha Baron Cohen

Director: Martin Scorsese

A boy named Hugo (Asa Butterfield) is orphaned after his father dies in a fire. Taken in by his drunken uncle who runs the massive clocks at the Paris Train Station, Hugo winds up (no pun intended) alone, once again, after his uncle disappears. Fending for himself, Hugo keeps the clocks running while working to restore a mechanical (automatronic) man, a museum relic on which his father had been working.

A colorful ensemble of characters frequents the train station, echoing the charms of an old Charlie Chaplin film. Among the denizens is a shopkeeper, George Méliès (Kingsley), who has it out for Hugo, convinced that Hugo had been stealing mechanical parts from his merchandise. The train station’s sole constable (Cohen) also presents a constant threat to Hugo, as he tries to capture the homeless boy, eager to remand him over to an orphanage.

Computer assisted imagery and masterfully blended cinematography combine for a visually stunning film. Legendary director Martin Scorsese imbues the production with sentimentality and nostalgia harkening to the days of silent film (again no pun intended).

As daily life unfolds, Hugo secretly befriends the shopkeeper’s goddaughter, Isabelle (Chloë Grace Moretz), who mysteriously happens to possess a special key, the only one that can unlock and make function the mechanical man.

Romantic side tales embellish, as well do several classic silent film clips. Inspiring and entertaining, Scorsese adds to his generous legacy.

My grade: A

Robert Reoch

Copyright Robert George Reoch Publishing

One World Trade Center Under Construction

One World Trade Center Under Construction

One World Trade Center aka Freedom Tower Construction Photos

Here is a link to some remarkable photos of One World Trade Center under construction. As of this writing, the tower had surpassed the height of The Empire State Building as the tallest building in Manhattan. I love New York!

Robert Reoch

Copyright Robert George Reoch Publishing

Limitless

Limitless

Limitless (2011) Starring: Bradley Cooper, Robert De Niro

Director: Neil Burger

An acquaintance gives a struggling writer (Bradley Cooper) a sample of a new drug (NZT) that causes his mind to expand at an extraordinary rate. Soon, his writing improves dramatically as does every other aspect of his life. He’s able to recall every experience he’s ever had or witnessed, bringing to bear knowledge and skills he had never used before. The world becomes his oyster.

Naturally, there’s a price to pay. Others want the secret. The film’s ultra-cerebral story and beautifully produced theatrics overcome its predictability. The result is a taut and exciting drama. Visually innovative and well acted.

My grade: B+

Robert Reoch

Copyright Robert George Reoch Publishing

The Ides of March

The Ides of March

The Ides of March (2011) Starring: George Clooney, Ryan Gosling, Philip Seymour Hoffman, Paul Giamatti, Evan Rachel Wood

Director: George Clooney

George Clooney plays it safe in this middle-of-the-road election politics drama. It’s a timely story. The structure is by the book, the acting is slightly more than competent. Although, Paul Giamatti, as the rivaling campaign manager, raises the pitch more so than others do.

Personally, I would have developed the character of Molly (Evan Rachel Wood) a little farther to expand the emotional dynamics a bit. There was plenty of time to do that, given this film goes just 101 minutes.

Philip Seymour Hoffman is in everything these days. I admire his work ethic and his craft.

I haven’t seen any other Clooney directed films as of this writing, so I can’t compare this to one of his others. I like this film. It was worth the price of a rental.

My grade: B-

Robert Reoch

Copyright Robert George Reoch 2009-2013

Drive

Drive
Drive (2011) Starring: Ryan Gosling, Carey Mulligan, Bryan Cranston, Albert Brooks, Ron Perlman, James Biberi

Director: Nicolas Winding Refn

Music: Cliff Martinez

Drive is cinematic perfection. Cliff Martinez’ music captures an essence and feel for LA that  reminded me of the American Gigolo soundtrack (music by Giorgio Moroder).

Ryan Gosling (whose character is unnamed) plays a stunt driver doing side work driving a getaway car  for armed crooks. Becoming friendly with his married neighbor, Irene (Carey Mulligan), things become complicated when he tries to help Irene’s husband, an ex-con, who is being threatened over old debts upon his release from prison.

Gosling’s driver is steel behind the wheel in souped-up chase scenes. His character develops quickly, growing throughout the story. His boss, Shannon (Bryan Cranston), at a garage on Reseda Boulevard, has dreams of owning a competitive stock car with (Gosling) driving it on the racing circuit with high paying sponsors. Cranston’s Shannon is a cringing, vulnerable stooge with one bum leg, and prone to bad luck. After successfully convincing a mobster named Bernie Rose (an unlikely but highly effective villain Albert Brooks), to bankroll his racing dream, things go sour. A rough entanglement ensues.

While Bernie Rose is the intimidating calculating businessman, his violent partner, Nino (Ron Perlman), epitomizes heavy handedness. The violence in this film comes through with masterfully created special effects.

Nicolas Winding Refn artfully directs with equal measures of bold strokes and a subtle brush. His characters interact with both tenderness and shocking brutality. The bursts of graphic violence rival that of any mob movie ever made, while other scenes linger languidly as Irene and her young son interact with the driver (Gosling), developing a tentative bond. The dialogue is sparse and not wastefully trite. Gosling’s driver is disarming as he melts the screen.

This film imparts nuances of the essential history and majesty of Los Angeles, even while snaking through its seamy underbelly. The contrasts and the crassness feel familiar to those who know LA. With music, often synthesized, the soundtrack brilliantly recalls a musicality from a 70s-80s synth age, sometimes grinding and pulsating rhythmically as in night music and the clubs. Always, the tone fits with the dynamic. This ride demands you crank up the sound of your home theater system. With superb cinematography and action, this is an exhilarating drive.

My grade: A+

Robert Reoch

Copyright Robert George Reoch Publishing

The Help

The Help

The Help  (2011) Starring: Viola Davis, Emma Stone, Bryce Dallas Howard, Octavia L. Spencer, Ahna O’Reilly, Jessica Chastain, Allison Janney, Sissy Spacek, Anna Camp, Eleanor Henry, Cicely Tyson

Director: Tate Taylor

The Help is great cinema with its authentic depiction of life in the south in 1963. Rich white families in rural Mississippi employed black women as full time maids. In this story, young, white, ambitious Eugenia “Skeeter” Phelan (Emma Stone) decides to write secretly a book exposing the unseen abuses endured by black workers in the town of Jackson where bigotry thrived. With a variety of characters, conflicting attitudes, and clashing personalities we have an epic story of personal and social evolution. The superb ensemble cast assures a rich interpretation of Kathryn Stockett’s book. In the hands of screen adapter/director, Tate Taylor, the production remains pure.

Viola Davis received a Best Actress Oscar nomination for her role. Octavia L. Spencer won for Best Supporting Actress in this film. Sissy Spacek’s scene stealing performance is notable too. Fans will relish this small, but memorable role. The entire cast are solid and convincing.

The DVD includes must-see Special Features. The director’s personal experiences parallel those of the story’s writer/personal friend. The behind the scenes back stories provide additional layers of fascinating nostalgia. Destined to become a classic.

My grade: A+

Robert Reoch

Copyright Robert George Reoch Publishing

Davy Jones Goodbye

Thank you Davy Jones

Davy Jones Dies

Davy Jones passed away at his home in Florida on February 29, 2012 (reportedly from a heart attack).

When I was growing up, the Monkees were huge and Davy Jones was a standout. His British accented voice was distinctly his own whether in speaking, or singing. Jones also possessed a rare wholesomeness that never wavered throughout his career.

Many people share worshiping rights to Davy Jones. He belonged to the millions who were made joyful by his personality and singing. When Davy Jones sang with The Monkees, everyone sang along. Nobody could resist singing while knowing all the words to, “Daydream Believer.” Davy had a knack for comedy too, which contributed greatly to the success of The Monkees TV series.

I recall attending a Monkees in concert (reunion tour) at the San Diego County Fair in the mid ’80s. Oingo Boingo was playing there too. I was into Oingo Boingo at the time, but was still surprisingly thrilled to see The Monkees. It was surreal to be near them, live, for the first time, even so many years after their 1960s popularity.

If you click on the Daydream Believer link above, you’ll hear Davy sing his most popular song. It all comes back if you’re from that era—guaranteed to make you nostalgic and a little sad.

My condolences to friends and family of Davy.

Goodbye Davy Jones. You will long be remembered with great affection. Thanks again.

Robert Reoch

Copyright Robert George Reoch Publishing

Paranormal Activity 3

Paranormal Activity 3

Paranormal Activity 3 (2011) Directors: Henry Joost, Ariel Schulman

Paranormal Activity 3 is, by far, the best of the three in this series of flicks thus far. The
premise is the same. The household sets up video cameras to study what is going bump in the night in their home during the wee hours of the morning as they sleep. What’s fun, this time, is the use of a rudimentary device to affect cinematic suspense—a camera mounted on an oscillating fan mechanism. As the video view pans back-and-forth, we observe ghastly changes in the nighttime activity.

This time, there is some actual activity. There’s actually a back story and a plot line too. I even experienced a fright or two. This time, it was more entertaining.

My grade: C+

Robert Reoch

Copyright Robert George Reoch Publishing

The Hangover Part II

The Hangover Part II

The Hangover Part II (2011) Starring: Bradley Cooper, Zach Galifianakis, Ken Jeong, Ed Helms, Paul Giamatti, Justin Bartha, Jeffrey Tambor, Mason Lee

Director: Todd Phillips

Yes, this film is practically the same movie as The Hangover (part 1). The premise is the same, just the settings have changed. This one also has a monkey and a few other new faces. Otherwise, its four besty guy pals getting into a whole lotta trouble when they’re supposed to be preparing for one buddy’s wedding. Some good laughs here and there. Ken Jeong is the standout in this episode, much as he was in the first. Jeffrey Tambor has an uncanny way of grounding a film that needs it. That’s called presence.

My grade: C+

Robert Reoch

Copyright Robert George Reoch Publishing

50/50

50/50

50/50 (2011) Starring: Joseph Gordon-Levitt, Seth Rogen, Anna Kendrick, Anjelica Huston

Director: Jonathan Levine

50/50 is a cancer movie. It’s a character study, well-acted and intelligent. Most of these films are very similar, but what separates this one is that it turns out the way you might hope it would. That’s not to say nobody dies, or is it? There’s more to it than that. Worthy entertainment. Seth Rogen, in a dramatic role, does well, as did the rest of the seasoned cast—as was expected.

My grade: B+

Robert Reoch

Copyright Robert George Reoch Publishing

Six Hour Birthday Cake

Birthday Cake Took Six Hours of Love

Monster Birthday Cake

Robert Reoch 6-Hour Birthday Cake

This is devotion.

Robert Reoch Cake 2

Tasted even better than it looked. Happy Birthday Joon!

I spent around six hours baking this monster birthday cake for someone very special to me. This chocolate and cherry bomb had it all goin’ on, including the most decadent chocolate ganache frosting dripping with cherries and little mandarin orange segments (some of Joon’s favorite things.) The best part was in the eating—

Yum!

Robert Reoch

Copyright Robert George Reoch Publishing

Thor

Thor

Thor (2011) Starring: Chris Hemsworth, Anthony Hopkins, Tom Hiddleston, Natalie Portman, Stellan Skarsgård, Idris Elba

Director: Kenneth Branagh

Thor is an unexpectedly contemporary take on the Norse god of the same name. In an updated story, Thor (Chris Hemsworth), is kicked out of his Norse Gods heavenly realm for being too reckless. His father, Odin (Sir Anthony Hopkins), is just about to crown him as successor to his throne when he instead is compelled to banish Thor for impetuously stirring up war with their longtime rivals, the Frost Giants. Thor plummets to earth, stripped of his powers, only to find himself flat on his back in the nighttime desert and a subject of interest for a tight group of star-gazing science nerds who have accidentally smacked into him with their science equipment vehicle. Jane Foster (Natalie Portman) develops an instant attraction to studly Thor as she’s dusting him off after the accident. The boy-meets-girl thing starts.

Enter the Federal Agents who noticed a foreign object (Thor’s powerful hammer), which has also fallen from the sky. Science geeks and Thor tussle with the Feds over the hammer and for the return of confiscated documents taken from the science team. Meanwhile, other battles are heating up back in Thor’s home realm where his bad brother, Loki (Tom Hiddleston), has plotted to take over their father’s throne by any means, including preventing Thor from returning from Earth.

It all runs like clockwork in entertaining fashion. The special effects are clean. There are plentiful robust battles between larger-than-life entities (yes, it’s another one of those movies). This is not your father’s Thor. The acting is great. The action is cartoonishly humorous at times. Nicely directed. Kenneth Branagh has it down.

My grade: A

Robert Reoch

Copyright Robert George Reoch Publishing

Crazy, Stupid, Love.

Crazy, Stupid, Love

Crazy, Stupid, Love (2011) Starring: Steve Carell, Ryan Gosling, Julianne Moore, Emma Stone, Marisa Tomei, Jonah Bobo, Analeigh Tipton

Directors: John Requa, Glenn Ficarra

Crazy, Stupid, Love is a fantastic look at the many faces of romance. Cal Weaver (Steve Carell) and his wife, Emily (Julianne Moore) find their 25-year marriage falling apart, while their adult daughter, Hannah (Emma Stone) explores her own romantic options. Meanwhile their youngest son, Robbie (Jonah Bobo), has his first crush on his teenage babysitter, Jessica (Analeigh Tipton), who has doe eyes for Robbie’s dad, Cal.

After separating from Emily, a forlorn Cal befriends a guy in a bar, Jacob (Ryan Gosling), who is a womanizer of the first degree. Receiving coaching and a male makeover from Jacob, Cal winds up having flings with several woman at the local club, including his son’s recovering alcoholic teacher, Kate (Marisa Tomei). The plot really thickens then.

As incredible as the character dynamics become, the movie works remarkably well. Excellent acting and realistic dialogue keep it interesting and often funny. Carell keeps a firm rein on his character, never going over the top. Tomei lets loose to great effect. Jonah Bobo steps into his role, and holds his own along with the stellar cast. A wonderful, original, modern film.

My grade: A

Robert Reoch

Copyright Robert George Reoch Publishing

Mission Impossible – Ghost Protocol

Mission Impossible – Ghost Protocol

Mission Impossible – Ghost Protocol (2011) Starring: Tom Cruise, Simon Pegg, Michael Nyqvist, Paula Patton, Jeremy Renner

Director: Brad Bird

On audience appeal, teenage boys are the obvious target here. This Mission is packed with explosions, mechanical gizmos, and spy weaponry. Adults will enjoy the nostalgia of Cold War stereotypes. The film’s primary villain is a Russian bent on blowing up the world. It’s always the same with those pesky Russians.

Tom Cruise, as Ethan Hunt again, has the right stuff this time. He projects intensity and effortlessness, unlike other recent turns where he’s been wound-up tighter than his smile. The only visual negative in this movie is the bad hair on nearly every character in the film. (You’ll see what I mean, but it doesn’t detract from the story.)

This Mission actually has two major tasks for the IMF team to complete over the course, filling up every second of its 110 minutes. Multiple complex characters keep things interesting too, while the changing global scenery supplies added visual depth. Altogether, worth a watch.

My grade: B+

Robert Reoch

Copyright Robert George Reoch Publishing

Super 8

Super 8

Super 8 (2011) Starring: Joel Courtney, Kyle Chandler, Elle Fanning, Riley Griffiths, Ron Eldard

Director: J. J. Abrams

Obvious story influences is Super 8 range from E.T. to Jeepers Creepers and even Stand By Me. The most redeeming quality of this film is its charismatic ensemble of preteen actors.

Super 8 refers to the old eight millimeter film used in cameras of the 60s and 70s. Set in the late 70s, a group of kids is making a zombie movie for a school project. While filming, they witness a spectacular train wreck. Out of the twisted metal and to their small town comes mystery and terror.

The tight group of characters each have distinct personalities, all easily winning our sympathy, which rarely happens in movies over the last few decades. This ensemble is irresistible from the beginning.

Among the effective cinematic devices vexing these children are a deep black hole in the ground, a cemetery,  kidnappings, and the adult figures who cannot understand all the urgency. Resisting the adults and other horrors, the band of youngsters press-on with their movie project, while terrifying secrets are unleashed by the train wreck. Soon, the entire town is facing a violent menace.

Joel Courtney (as Joe Lamb), in his first ever film, is already someone to watch. The same goes for Elle Fanning with her impressive turn as Alice Dainard. I see great things coming from these two young actors.

Even with its overabundance of loud explosions and some graphic violence, this film charms. Gratifying entertainment.

My grade: B+

Robert Reoch

Copyright Robert George Reoch Publishing

Horrible Bosses

Horrible Bosses

Horrible Bosses (2011) Starring: Jason Bateman, Jason Sudeikis, Colin Farrell, Jennifer Aniston, Charlie Day, Kevin Spacey, Jamie Foxx

Director: Seth Gordon

Horrible Bosses is well thought out and certain to endure on video and/or television, although it’ll need a lot of editing for sexual content and language.

Three friends each have uniquely despicable bosses, and getting out from under their thumbs requires planning and finesse. Unfortunately, these guys are lacking in finesse—the punchline to this comedy.

Kevin Spacey’s vile boss portrayal stands out. Jamie Foxx steals scenes with his great comedy chops too.

My grade: B

Robert Reoch

Copyright Robert George Reoch Publishing

Christmas Cookies

Christmas Cookies

Cookies Cookies Cookies I’m a Cookie Monster

The main reason I enjoy baking Christmas cookies is to eat them! My recipe for butter cookies includes cardamom (the secret spice that reminds your taste buds it’s holiday season). With a few well-chosen cookie cutters, some colored icing, and a little finesse, these tasty gems make the season right. Ha!

Christmas Cookies Robert ReochChristmas Cookies Robert Reoch

 

 

 

Christmas Cookies Robert Reoch

 

 

 

Merry Christmas!

Robert Reoch

Copyright Robert George Reoch Publishing